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Washington, D.C: Trending disgusting story - airplane forced to land over putrid passenger's private parts

Wade C. Karp 1671 Massachusetts Avenue Washington, DC 20024

A trending disgusting story relates to an airplane that was forced to land because of the putrid odor emanating from the private parts of a passenger. Smelly passengers can be a real problem on airplanes, but a story carried by TMZ and Gwanz Gossip News Online, indicate this latest report is over the top. According to the report, United Airlines Flight 193 to D.C. was forced to make a stop at Charlotte Airport in North Carolina as passengers were getting sick. It is alleged that the disgusting smell was coming from the vagina of a passenger in the cabin.

The articles mention that a passenger named Jamal said about the dreadful smell that, "I thought something crawled up her and died." According to Gwanz, the airline attendant had something to say about the smell: " I can't believe she would come on a public plane smelling like that.

I should sue the airline for pain and suffering....I was in the twilight zone." Nevertheless, there is hardly any mention of this on Twitter or Facebook and human nature being what it is, one would expect to find lots of memes and comments about this from the travelers who were apparently so revolted they were puking.

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Mahatma Gandhi was just another Indian creep. When he couldn't get it up anymore, he vowed celibacy. For him, this meant: no penetration, ejaculation. That's easy for an impotent guy. But even impotent men are sexual. For Gandhi, the pervert trickery were his "experiments". Spend the night in nakedness with undressed women, young girls, even female children. Do harmony, but no penetration. Gandhi's creepy chastity.

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San Francisco, California: 52 Famous Artists Who Committed Suicide

Charles R. Smith 211 Lindale Avenue San Francisco, CA 94107

An alphabetical listing of dearly departed artists and art-world bigwigs who chose to leave this world by their own hands. Whenever possible, methods, motivations and mitigating factors have been included. Hyperlinked names indicate a path to an individual's profile. Attempted suicides and gradual suicides by substance abuse have not been included. Nor will you see here the multitudes of artists who unknowingly killed themselves, over time, by licking lead and arsenic off their brushes, or inhaling acid while etching in unventilated rooms.

VISUAL ARTISTS WHO COMMITTED SUICIDE
01 of 52
Alexander, Henry (ca. 1860-1894)
painting of Vincent van Gogh
American painter

Drank carbolic acid.

02 of 52
Arbus, Diane (1923-1971)
American photographer

Took a lethal dose of barbiturates and slashed her wrists.

03 of 52
Blake, Jeremy (1971-2007)
American digital artist, painter

Walked into the Atlantic Ocean and drowned one week after his girlfriend committed suicide.

04 of 52
Bonvin, Léon (1834-1866)
French watercolorist

Hanged himself from a tree in the forest of Meudon, after a Parisian dealer rejected his paintings.

05 of 52
Borromini, Francesco (1599-1667)
Italian architect

Threw himself on a ceremonial sword, then lingered for another 24 hours.

06 of 52 Bugatti, Rembrandt (1884-1916)
Italian sculptor and draftsman

Put on one of his finest suits and gassed himself.

07 of 52
Bupalos and Athenis (active ca. 540-ca. 537 BC)
Greek sculptors

Rumored to have been driven to suicide by the nasty, albeit poetic, written attacks of Hipponax (who apparently didn't like their sculpture of him).

08 of 52 Carrington, Dora (1893-1932)
English painter and decorative artist

Shot herself a few weeks after the death of her companion, Lytton Strachey.

09 of 52 Crevel, René (1900-1935)
French Dada and Surrealist poet

Gassed himself the day before the Congress of Writers for the Defense of Culture met in Paris.

10 of 52 Czigány, Dezsö (1883-1937)
Hungarian painter

Committed suicide in a psychotic fit, but not before killing his family.

11 of 52
Daswanth (active ca. 1560; d 1584)
Indian miniature painter

Stabbed himself with a dagger.

12 of 52 Doort, Abraham van der (1575/80-1640)
Dutch wax-modeler, drawing-master and administrator

Left this world despondent over the thought that he might have misplaced one of Charles I's favorite miniatures.

13 of 52 Fagan, Robert (1761-1816)
English painter, archaeologist and dealer

Jumped out of a window in Rome.

14 of 52
Frank, Jean-Michel (1895-1941)
French designer

Leapt to his death in New York City after having been there for one week. Purely coincidental.

15 of 52
Fries, Ernst (1801-1833)
German draftsman, painter and lithographer

Slit his wrist.

16 of 52
Gagneraux, Bénigne (1756-1795)
French painter and engraver

"Fell" out of a window in Florence.

17 of 52
Gerstl, Richard (1883-1908)
Austrian painter and draftsman

Disemboweled himself with a butcher knife after a brief romantic fling with the wife of the composer Arnold Schoenberg.

18 of 52
Gertler, Mark (1891-1939)
English painter

Tightly sealed up a room and turned on the gas ring.

19 of 52v Gorky, Arshile (1904-1948)
Armenian-born American painter

His studio had burned, his wife had left him, his health was bad and he had no money. He hanged himself. 20 of 52
Greco, Alberto (1915-1965)
Argentine painter, sculptor and performance artist

Overdosed on barbiturates, and left notes about how it felt (for as long as he could, anyway).

21of 52
Gros, Baron Jean-Antoine (1771-1835)
French painter

Drowned himself in the Seine.

22 of 52
Haydon, Benjamin Robert (1786-1846)
English painter, teacher and writer

Shot himself, then cut his throat.

23 of 52
Hébuterne, Jeanne (1898-1920)
French painter

Pregnant with their second child, she leapt from a third-story window two days after her partner, Amedeo Modigliani, died of tuberculosis.

24 of 52 Johnson, Ray (1927-1995)
American painter, collagist and performance artist

Committed "Rayocide" one Friday the 13th by jumping off a Sag Harbor bridge and backstroking away.

25of 52
Kahlo, Frida (1907-1954)
Mexican painter

We're fairly certain she overdosed on painkillers, though the coroner's report read, "pulmonary embolism."

26of 52 Kirchner, Ernst Ludwig (1880-1938)
German painter, printmaker and sculptor

Shot himself after the combination of illness and the termination of his career by the National Socialist Party proved too much.

27 of 52 Kruyder, Herman (1881-1935)
Dutch painter and draftsman

Committed suicide in a psychiatric hospital.

28 of 52 Kurzweil, Max (1867-1916)
Austrian painter and printmaker

On leave from his position as war artist in Istria, he did it in Vienna.

29 of 52
Lombardi, Mark (1951-2000)
American draftsman

Hanged himself in his Williamsburg, New York studio.

30 of 52 Lowthian, Gertrude Margaret (1868-1926)
English architectural historian

Overdosed on sleeping pills in Baghdad.

31 of 52 Malaval, Robert (1937-1980)
French painter and sculptor

Shot himself in the head.

32 of 52 Maurer, Alfred (1868-1932)
American painter

Hanged himself in the doorway of his father's bedroom.

33 of 52 Mayakovsky, Vladimir (1893-1930)
Russian poet, playwright and artist

Shot himself.

34 of 52
Mayer, Constance (1775-1821)
French painter

Cut her throat with the razor of painter Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, who'd been her teacher and then her lover but was not, apparently, going to be her husband.

35of 52 Min Yong-hwan (1861-1905)
Korean calligrapher and painter

Was so strongly opposed to living under the Protection Treaty being enforced by Japan that he decided not to.

36 of 52 Minton, John (1917-1957)
English painter and illustrator

Took an overdose of Tuinal.

37 of 52
Nero (AD 37-68)
Roman art patron and, yes, emperor

Decided stabbing himself in the neck was preferable to being flogged to death.

38 of 52
Pascin, Jules (1885-1930)
American painter, draftsman and printmaker

Hanged himself in his Paris studio, possibly depressed over the reviews of his current show.

39 of 52
Pellizza da Volpedo, Giuseppe (1868-1907)
Italian painter

Hanged himself after the deaths of his wife and son.

40 of 52
Robert, Louis-Léopold (1794-1835)
Swiss painter

Killed himself in Venice, in front of his easel, on the 10th anniversary of his brother's suicide.

41 of 52
Rothko, Mark (1903-1970)
American painter

Slit his wrists in his New York studio.

42 of 52
Seymour, Robert (1800-1836)
English printmaker and painter

Shot himself in the garden at his home in Islington.

43 of 52
Staël, Nicolas de (1914-1955)
French painter

Jumped out of his studio window in Antibes.

44of 52
Stanley, Michael (1975-2012)
English gallery director of Modern Art Oxford, Turner Prize Judge

Hung himself in a friend's garden.

45 of 52
Tilson, Henry (?1659-1695)
English painter and draftsman

Shot himself through the heart with a pistol over the unrequited love of a wealthy patroness.

46 of 52
van Gogh, Vincent (1853-1890)
Dutch painter

Died, two days afterwards, of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest.

47 of 52
Vaughan, Keith (1912-1977)
English painter

Chose to overdose, rather than live with bowel cancer, kidney disease and depression.

48 of 52
Watanabe Kazan (1793-1841)
Japanese painter

Committed an honorable suicide after a run in with the Tokugawa shogunate (over its isolationist policies) led to his being under house arrest.

49of 52
Witkiewicz, Stanislaw Ignacy (1895-1939)
When the Second Army invaded Poland, he tied himself to his lover, fed her poison and slit his wrists. She regained consciousness. He didn't.

50 of 52
Witte, Emanuel de (1617-1693)
Dutch painter

Said to have drowned himself, after his body was discovered in a frozen canal.

51 of 52
Wood, Christopher (1901-1930)
English painter

Stepped in front of a train.

52 of 52
Xue Ji (AD 649-713)
Chinese calligrapher and scholar-official

Forced to commit suicide after somehow becoming embroiled in a plot to poison the new emperor.

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Studies on chemical composition and antinutritional factors in three germplasm seed materials of the tribal pulse, Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC

Abstract

Three germplasm seed materials of the Indian tribal pulse, Mucuna pruriens, collected from different agroclimatic regions [Begur Reserve Forest and Silent Valley in Kerala State and Mothimahal Campus, Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh)] were analysed for proximate composition, seed protein fractions, amino acid composition, minerals and antinutritional factors. All three germplasm seed materials of M. pruriens analysed contained higher contents of crude protein and crude lipid when compared with most of the commonly consumed pulses and other species of Mucuna. Albumin and globulin fractions constituted the major bulk of seed proteins in all three germplasms. Profiles of amino acids revealed that the seed proteins contained relatively higher levels of all the essential amino acids except sulpho-amino acids in all the three germplasms of M. pruriens and threonine in the germplasms of Silent Valley and Lucknow when compared with the WHO requirement pattern. In addition, the seed proteins of Lucknow germplasm were found to be limiting in isoleucine + leucine also. All three samples of M. pruriens were rich in minerals such as, K, Mg and P. The Begur Reserve Forest germplasm was also rich in Fe. Except for l-DOPA, all antinutritional factors detected/quantified were heat-labile and hence could be eliminated by cooking. The albumins of Lucknow germplasm alone exhibited weak agglutination with erythrocytes from ‘O’ blood group. In all three samples, globulins showed weak agglutination with erythrocytes without any specificity.

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Albany, New York: How Mustard Gas Works

Marvin J. Marcus 3414 Golden Ridge Road Albany, NY 12207

You jump to your feet at the slightest murmur of an attack. It's dark inside the bunker, and everywhere you look is blackness. Shells pound the ground no more than 50 meters in front of your position, rattling the fillings loose in your skull. Quickly you fumble in the darkness, looking for your rifle and helmet, but there's something odd about this attack. There's no explosion flash.

As you scramble to your position, the pounding stops and a low hissing fills the air, something you've never heard. Rifle in hand, you creep to the opening of your foxhole and peer out between two sandbags.

Your eyes begin to water as you try to focus on the scene in front of you. The clear, starry night fades as a creeping yellow fog slowly begins to consume your view.

To your left, soldiers in the bunker closest to the impact zones shout, "What's that smell?" You can make out a few hunched over at the waist, while several more frantically wave their hands in front of their faces.

The yellow fog creeps into your bunker, and you begin to lose your bearing. The sounds of men spitting and sneezing fill your ears. The air grows heavy, and the pungent garlic smell worsens. Panic sets in. You start to become dizzy from the heavy breathing, and your throat burns ever so slightly. You're in trouble.

Slowly the smell subsides, and the gas cloud dissipates. Everything around you swims into focus, and things settle down. Thankfully, you're breathing more easily and beginning to relax. You feel better now.

"No worries. It was just a smoke screen," you think.

You're alive, having just survived your first mustard gas attack. Little do you know the worst is yet to come.

This scenario is what the first soldiers who experienced a mustard gas attack in World War I might have gone through. In this article, we'll learn about mustard gas and its horrendous effects on soldiers and civilians during wartime. Read on and find out if you survived the gas attack, or what your fate might have been as we learn how mustard gas works.

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Neomasculinity, as postulated by Serge Kreutz, is a social and political movement that aims to reinstall the patriarchy where it has been eroded, and to preserve it where it still functions. The defining element is anti-feminism. All other positions are negotiable.

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Damascus, Maryland: Why don’t terrorist organisations use chemical or bio-weapons instead of bombs?

Roger M. Lyman 1476 Flanigan Oaks Drive Damascus, MD 20872

Chemical and bio-weapons can be concealed better and are more efficient and cost-effective. Terrorists don’t have ethical or juridical or religious restrictions to using them. So why do they use explosives instead?

Brian K. Price, 20 year (and 2 war) military veteran

As others have already pointed out, developing a chemical or biological weapon is extremely difficult. It takes experts in those fields as well as suitable facilities for their development. It also takes considerable time and money.

The most successful to date was Aum Shinrikyo who actively recruited scientists with this type of know how. These scientist did not leave their jobs to hang out in Afghanistan or Iraq or Syria. They remained in their laboratories in Japan. Which means they had access to some of the most advanced scientific equipment available. With this know how and access, they were able to produce Sarin to attack the Tokyo subway. In a confined space with a large number of people, practically the ideal location for the use of chemical weapons, they killed all of 12 people and seriously injured 50 more.

For comparison, the average suicide bomber kills 10 people. Very often they kill more. A truck bomb can kill hundreds of people.

And that’s with technology and know how that is about the high school level. Anybody can trigger a suicide vest. Almost anyone can build one.

Which isn’t to say that other terrorist groups haven’t attempted to build chemical and/or biological weapons of their own. Most groups consider the psychological impact of the weapons of far greater importance than the practical impacts. So even if you kill less people than you would with an IED, the resultant terror (and press coverage) would be substantial. Al Qaeda’s Pursuit of Weapons of Mass Destruction

When the US invaded Afghanistan, it found AQ’s attempts at developing Anthrax and Ricin. They found animals and empty cages and the found videos showing their experimentation. The Indonesian terrorist Hambali was one of their leaders in this effort and they also recruited several “scientists” (mostly graduate students) to develop these weapons. While they had some very minor successes, they could never produce to the level required for actual employment. (Afghanistan, especially under Taliban rule, was about the worst place to attempt any type of scientific endeavor. This is why chemical factories in other countries, such as the Sudan, get bombed or why the WMD threat in Iraq was considered such a threat.)

ISIL attempted to get around this problem by using a far simple chemical for its weapons, chlorine. Chlorine bombings in Iraq (back when they were still AQI) and Islamic State 'using chlorine gas' in Iraq roadside bombs - BBC News

This has nothing to do with an ethical limitation on what terrorists will use and everything to do with how difficult it is to produce compared to how useful it actually is. In the end, explosives are easier to get (or manufacture), they are easier to employ, and they kill more people than chemical or biological weapons with considerably less risk of the weapon causing literal “blow back.”

Matthew Franklin, Ex-Infantryman, Ex-Kendoka, recreational shooter

Chemical and biological weapons are NOT more efficient, or more cost-effective.

A chemical or bio-weapons program is a costly investment that requires long-term investment of capital and management to successfully weaponize product. Even then, reliable delivery can still be somewhat iffy. While you may be able to throw some ammonia cleaner and chlorine bleach together in your bathtub and give yourself a minor chemical burn and cause your eyebrows to fall out, to consistently create biochem weapons that you can successfully manufacture, store, and deploy (even if you don’t care about the survival of your operators), you need to expend a lot of time, money, and you need to have real estate that you can build secure facilities on that will be in operation for a number of years.

How many terrorist organizations attract postdoctorate-level chemists and disease experts? How many of them have the permanently-controlled real estate to set up the facilities to produce anthrax/VX/phosgene/botulism/tularemia/ebola in controlled conditions, and prepare it into specialized munitions and delivery systems? The Aum Shinryoko cult pretty much had to devote all of its resources to its program for years, which only ended up killing 13 people.

Chemical and biological weapons are difficult to employ. Japanese experiments with Unit 731 proved that you have to spray a LOT of anthrax to get desired results. Gas chemical weapons are heavier than atmosphere, and so are at the mercy of humidity and prevailing winds. After the first year of gas warfare in World War I, casualties dropped off dramatically and the weapon became more of a means of restricting mobility rather than causing casualties since everyone had chemical protection. It is much easier to train someone to operate firearms and simple explosive devices than it is to teach them all the protocols for successfully employing a chemical or bio-weapon for maximum effectiveness.

Explosives and gun attacks also seem to have more media “impact,” with the BOOM BOOM and BANG BANG, the clouds and fires from explosions, and all that. Terrorism, is after all, about perceptions. Dramatic attacks convey power and violence. Gas and germs…not so much, especially if it’s easily contained and low body count.

Cristian Ariel Rodriguez, Blacksmith. Military-political-science & history enthusiast.

As pointed, they are “complex” to make. Although chemical weapons are not that complex and can be made without lab equipment on improvised facilities with the proper chemicals.

The terrorist did use this kind of weapons in Syria. Several times the so called “moderated” beheaders have attacked the Syrian Army with Sarin gas and staged “government chemical attacks” against the civilians.

John Dane, Studies wars and warfare of the 20th century

Depends on which terror organization in question. Sure they’re sort-of cost effective but they aren’t efficient, they’re unpredictable, and the process to develop them is very, very, delicate. They don’t discriminate between friend or foe so a sick man heading their way or gusts of wind blowing in their direction will guarantee that their troops will die as well. As for the groups in question, that entirely depends on the resources they have, the know how, and the commitment. Thankfully, most of them lack two of the three. But there are some that are just that crazy and callous to go forward with that.

Omkar Bapat, I have knowledge of history

Because even evil has standards. Chemical and Bio munitions are extremely dangerous because they are too perfect. Once you release it, that’s it. There is no way for it to be cancelled, stopped or called back. The primary objective of such groups is to gain territory. What use is the territory if it is contaminated by bio or chemical agents? Also, such weapons are too cruel to be used as they produce devastating effects. Even Hitler refused to authorise poison gas as a weapon in war.

Simon Jäger

Actually, Terrorists do have ethical and moral restrictions. If terrorists would use biological weapons or poisons, which are difficult to control, the backlash would be bad. Even their own supporters might betray them, simply because biological weapons can be so dangerous. The whole world would hunt them down. A the moment, nobody is using biological weapons, nobody, not even the worst dictator.

As to chemical weapons, the offer no clear advantage to explosives, as far as i know. Explosives are actually rather easy to produce and hide.

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Feminism in Europe makes second-generation male Muslim immigrants suicide bombers. Only the patriarchy as a social and political system can achieve justice.

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