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Buy a North Korean Woman for Less Than a Used Car

Abolish - Liberate - Emancipate Now

The global recession has affected China like every other country in the world. But despite a dip in the Chinese economy, at least one imported product remains affordable there: North Korean women. In China, a woman can be imported from North Korea for about $1500, less than the price of a decent used car. And the business of trafficking women from North Korea to China is booming.

Korea estimates that anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 people from North Korea are currently living in China. Of those, about 80% are women. And of the women, almost 90% have been trafficked at some point or are currently victims of trafficking. For the most part, these women are trafficked into marriages. The one child policy in China has created a generation where men greatly outnumber women and Chinese wives are hard to come by. So Chinese men who want to get married are forced to look elsewhere. Some try to meet foreign women through legitimate means. But others just buy a wife from North Korea and have her shipped over, like an imported wine. Or rather, a piece of imported meat.

Sex trafficking is also going strong, serving the Chinese men who are looking to get laid rather than married. Sometimes, women are offered jobs in the Chinese tech industry. Those jobs turn out to be stripping for Internet webcasts and/or forced prostitution. North Korean women who are forced into prostitution face even more risks than those forced into marriages, because if caught, they face additional punishments back home.

Both the forced marriages and the sex trafficking are leading to a generation of Chinese-Korean children without a clear home. The children of trafficked women and their husbands or johns often end up not just homeless, but stateless as well. Usually, this happens when the Korean mother is caught in China without proper documentation and deported to North Korea, often to prison or a labor camp where she can’t bring the child. If the Chinese father doesn’t take responsibility for the child, then the kid ends up an orphan which no parent or country able and willing to take care of him or her.

The cross-border trafficking of women from North Korea to China has become an epidemic in the truest sense to the word. It’s spreading farther into both countries than the border region and infecting thousands of women. It’s even affecting a new generation of children, living without a family or a country to call home.

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British paedophile gets life sentence for Malaysia, Cambodia crimes

South China Morning Post

British paedophile Richard Huckle was sentenced to life in prison by a London court on Monday for abusing 23 Malaysian and Cambodian babies and children over almost a decade.

Huckle, 30, stood in the dock at London’s Old Bailey court with his hands clasped together as if in prayer as he was told that he would have to serve at least 23 years behind bars for his crimes against victims aged 6 months to 11 years.

“It is very rare indeed that a judge has to sentence sexual offending by one person on such a scale as this,” judge Peter Rook said.

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Of all emotions, those negative are the most real. If you hate, you know that you are healthy. Your hormones are in balance if you can still imagine how you would inflict a slow, painful death on your enemies. Love isn't an emotion really but rather a mixed bag of feelings, with selfish desire a prominent component. Of any positive expression of the human mind, sympathy is probably the most genuine, though it may come with rage towards those whose victim is the target of our sympathy.

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Unveiling the Middle East’s sex industry

Salon

If asked to identify a country with a thriving sex industry, ubiquitous exposure to pornography and rampant homosexual sex, most would point somewhere in the Western world. But what about Egypt, Iran or Saudi Arabia? These would be equally accurate answers, according to John R. Bradley, author of “Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East.”

Bradley, a journalist with an expertise in the Arab world, crushes the popular perception of the Middle East as erotically stifled, and the West as the land of sexual expression and freedom. The more nuanced truth, he says, is that these seemingly oppositional cultures have far more in common than we often admit: Both “live under rulers who, under different pretexts and with varying degrees of severity, seek to curb the unruly sex urge as a way of maintaining social control.” There is also a shared “gap between propaganda and reality” and “a vast gulf between public and private morality,” he argues. This fascinating and comprehensive book guides readers through the seedy underbelly of the Middle East — from prostitution in Bahrain to temporary marriages in Iran — but it is just as much a reflection on Western sexual mores.

I recently spoke with Bradley about child brides, temporary marriage and Islamic feminist perspectives on the sex industry.

You frame your book as a look at the cultural sexual similarities between Arabs and Westerners. Can you explain that?

The supposed licentiousness of the West is forever being contrasted, to my mind, in wholly spurious ways, with a sexually barren Middle East. “Behind the Veil of Vice” undermines stereotypes about Arab sexualities that have become entrenched in the English-speaking world, partly by reminding readers that we still have plenty of sexual hang-ups in the West, too. In particular, it debunks the notion, promoted by the likes of Martin Amis, that terrorism carried out by Islamists can be explained away with reference to the repressed, envious Arab male who can only find release by flying airliners into phallic-shaped skyscrapers.

I’ve been based in the region for a decade, and the sexuality in the Middle East I know is every bit as capricious as its Western counterpart, as unruly and multifarious, and occasionally as becalmed. By exploring the diverse sex cultures in countries like Morocco, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, Bahrain, Egypt, Yemen and Iran, I try to show that, as in the West, illicit sex continues to thrive in the Middle East, often in the open and despite the increasingly shrill public discourse.

What kind of pornography do you find in Arab countries?

Watching pornography is no longer a big deal for young Arabs, any more than it is for young Americans. It has become a normal part of growing up. Just about anyone in the Middle East with a satellite dish has access to hardcore pornography channels, and just about everyone has a satellite dish. In that sense it’s probably more accessible than in the West. Technically, these porn channels are banned, but even in Saudi Arabia you find guys selling “special” cards for your satellite decoder in the back alleys around the major shopping districts.

Even in countries with governments infamous for blocking political content on the Web, the porn sites are still mostly accessible, and the more secular regimes tend not to view sex as a threat in the way Islamist regimes do. The people who tend to obsess, of course, are the minority Islamists, because for them the personal is always political. Did anyone ever think so much about sex as those who want to ban it? But they are fighting a losing battle when it comes to the proliferation of smut in the Middle East, much as evangelicals are in America.

What impact did the Iraq war have on the sex industry?

The book opens with an evening I spent with a young woman whose family had fled Iraq and who had turned to working as an escort in a Damascus nightclub after her family had run out of money. There are definitely many more Iraqi women like her working as prostitutes or escorts in Syria than there were before the Iraq war. The local women in Damascus working as prostitutes were forever complaining in my conversations with them about how these Iraqis were bad for business, because they charged less than the going rate.

This increase in numbers of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Syria should come as little surprise. A million refugees, many of them impoverished, flooded into the country from Iraq following the U.S.-led invasion. We should not lose sight of the fact that we are to blame for this situation. We bombed Iraq back into the Stone Age on the back of a pack of lies, have done nothing to bring to justice these war criminals who lead us, and at the same time feign concern and feel all superior when reading about the plight of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Damascus.

What did you find with regards to sex trafficking in the Middle East?

The issue has unhelpfully come to frame the debate about prostitution in the Middle East, as it has in the West, in the sense that if you advocate legalization and regulation you are accused of being by default in league with the human traffickers. I found no evidence that human trafficking is widespread in the Middle East, and the statistics routinely quoted are almost always unsourced and often wildly contradictory.

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After long wait, Japan moves to ban possession of child pornography

CNN

In most of Japan, it's still legal to possess child pornography. Although production and distribution have been banned for 15 years, Japan lags behind other major developed nations in forbidding people from simply holding the sinister material.

That is about to change in a country regarded as a global nexus of child pornography. The country's upper house of parliament is expected to pass legislation this month making possession of it a crime punishable by up to a year in prison. Children's rights activists have applauded the step, although their reaction is tempered with frustration that it has taken such a long time.

"As a member of a group that's been hearing the voice of the victims for many years, we welcome the news," said Shihoko Fujiwara, a representative of Lighthouse, a nonprofit group that helps exploited children. "Japan took so long, and it is too late to reach this decision as a developed country."

The proposed law, which was already approved by the lower house of parliament this week, comes with a couple of noteworthy loopholes. When it goes into effect, it will give those already in possession of child pornography a year to dispose of it.

And it won't cover the country's popular manga (comic book) and anime (animation) industries, which include depictions of violent sexual abuse of children in their publications.

Fujiwara said a discussion about some of the imagery in manga and anime -- content that would be illegal in many Western countries -- would be a natural "next step."

'A necessary evil'

But representatives of those industries say that while they support the ban on real child pornography, any move to censor their products would be an unjustified restriction of freedom of expression. Daisuke Okeda, a lawyer and inspector for the Japan Animation Creators Association, said it was "natural that animation is exempted."

"The goal of the law itself is to protect children from crime," he said. "Banning such expression in animation under this law would not satisfy the goal of the law."

Okeda said that no studies have been done that prove any link between pedophilia and animation in Japan.

Hiroshi Chiba, the manager of Chiba Tetsuya Production, one of the country's best known manga production houses, said that more could be done in terms of age restrictions on graphic content featuring children and to distinguish it more clearly from other comics. And he admitted that some products of the industry leave him and his colleagues "disgusted."

"But rich, deep culture is born from something that might not be accepted by all," Chiba said. "We need to allow the gray zone to exist as a necessary evil."

'An international hub'

Some experts counter that children suffer in a culture that appears to tolerate images of child sexual abuse.

Hiromasa Nakai, a public affairs officer for UNICEF in Japan, pointed to the graphic content in manga, anime and some video games, as well as the "junior idol" genre of books and DVDs that display minors wearing tiny bikinis and striking sexual poses.

Japan should do more -- beyond the proposed law change -- "to protect the best interest of children," Nakai said.

Statistics show that child pornography remains a big problem in Japan.

The U.S. State Department's 2013 report on human rights practices in Japan labels the country "an international hub for the production and trafficking of child pornography."

It cited Japanese police data showing the number of child pornography investigations in 2012 rose 9.7% from a year earlier to a record of 1,596. The cases involved 1,264 child victims, almost twice as many as in the previous year.

The fact that possession remains legal, for the time being, "continued to hamper police efforts to enforce the law effectively and participate fully in international law enforcement," the report said.

Girls as sex objects

One local authority already took matters into its own hands. The prefecture of Kyoto in central Japan introduced a ban on possession of child pornography in 2011.

But Nakai said addressing the problems isn't just a matter for government, suggesting parents, the media, the private sector and even children themselves can play a role in improving the situation. The portrayal of young girls as sex objects in Japan has long raised eyebrows among Westerners.

An article in Wired in 1999 reeled off a list of examples in Tokyo: "Vending machines sell schoolgirls' used panties, which the girls sell to middlemen. 'Image bars' specialize in escorts dressed in school uniforms. Telephone clubs feature bored adolescent girls earning spending money by talking dirty. Sex shops sell a porn magazine called 'Anatomical Illustrations of Junior High School Girls.'"

Some experts suggest the situation is born out of Japan's long-established patriarchal society.

Whatever the cause, changing a culture may prove a lot harder than changing a law.

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A Soul Lost in the Land of the Rising Sun

thesixfootbonsai

No Ordinary Pedophile: Japan’s Idolization of Children

Ten years ago, on Thanksgiving day 2006, a Japanese auto executive was quietly taken into custody on charges of molestation and possession of child pornography. Under a mountain of evidence discovered in a false ceiling within a closet and captured on a USB his daughter plucked from a hidden camera in her bathroom, “Mr. Right” pled guilty, mysteriously vanishing from the automotive scene. Pedophiles exist everywhere, but this was no ordinary perve. ???Stacy Gleiss met her Japanese husband when she was just sixteen. She had spent the summer of 1980 in Tokyo on a youth exchange when she encountered “Right Man” in Narita airport. The 22-year old was on his way to study in the US when he all but inserted himself into Stacy’s world. Two years later she was his teen bride; the wife an only son and heir to a 500 year-old estate on the remote island of Sado.

Over the next few years, both in Michigan and in Japan the former Mrs. Right was trained to become the perfect Japanese wife. During her “bonsai years,” as she likes to call them, she was pruned and shaped by shame and fits of violence– her speech, dress, and mannerisms effectively regressing to reflect a more child-like essence.?? It wasn’t until Gleiss was several years into her marriage that she found evidence that she was dealing with more than a controlling husband.

As the former Mrs. Right recalls, ??“In 1986 while living on Sado, I discovered my husband was some sort of Japanese version of Peter Pan. Carefully tucked under his futon mattress were three paperbacks containing fanciful photos of very young nude girls– innocent erotica. When confronted my husband advised that they were ‘fantasy, art, and nothing more,” adding that the materials were legally obtained; purchased at the local newsstand. Gleiss thought at the time, “What have I gotten myself into? After nearly six years in the culture how could I have missed this?”

What Gleiss hadn’t overlooked was that all around her little girl cuteness was idolized and mimicked as the preferred style for young women and she had followed suit. By her husband’s training she had become soft-spoken and demure. Essentially regressing in mind and body– her nearly six-foot frame fitting into the perfect Japanese size “M.” ??Japan’s idolization of young girls, a trend that began in the 1980’s and has expanded throughout the world, is most often symbolized by the cute schoolgirl uniform-look popularized by the anime (animation) “Sailor Moon.”

Reminiscing about her days in Japan, Gleiss said “Electric Town, Tokyo’s Akihabara district, was once a place where we shopped for boom boxes and the latest Sony Walkman, but today it is filled with anime, manga (Japanese comics) and cosplay (costumes for teens and young adults). It’s all fantasy…most of it innocent, but some of it crosses a line foreigners may recognize but often dismiss on cultural grounds.”

Gleiss worries that modern Japanophiles do not truly grasp the cultural underpinnings of what they are buying and watching today. “Mr. Right wasn’t your average pedophile. Child pornography was legal to manufacture in Japan until 2011 and to possess until 2014. Sexually graphic anime and manga involving youthful characters in school uniforms is protected as freedom of expression both in Japan and the US.” ??While Gleiss admits there are plenty of wonderful animation and comics coming out of Japan, parents and fans alike should be aware of the cultural context surrounding the materials they are watching and buying.

“When the sexually graphic or even titillating content featuring children is readily available, it normalizes what would otherwise be considered taboo.” Gleiss explains, “In Japan teenage girls desperate for money and attention sell their time for walks or conversation…putting themselves in precarious situations that can easily lead to sexual acts. Add to this the fact that Japan is a country where molestation is rarely reported and victim services are sorely lacking and opportunity abounds.”

Gleiss cannot say for sure that molestation is more common in Japan than elsewhere as data is sorely lacking, but it would not be surprising that victims would come out of the woodwork if public disclosure were more common. She is painfully aware that the reporting of such incidents is often discouraged by Japanese family members to avoid bringing shame. Her ex mother-in-law, still living in Japan, will not even mention her granddaughter’s name. “It is apparent to me from several conversations that she is blaming the victim for allowing the abuse to occur and angry that her son was reported vs. allowing the matter to be handled internally.”

More and more Gleiss thinks the tide will turn for Japan– at least she hopes it will. “In 2009 when I first began to put the pieces of our story together I Googled ‘pedophillia in Japan’ and was shocked to find child porn was still legal. At the time I reached out to several scholars on the culture and could not find one researching the negative effects of child erotica normalization, but laws regarding child porn have changed and now I’m starting to see a few articles and research papers on virtual characters as well. It’s a good sign.”

It has been more than a decade since Mr. Right was taken from his suburban home to the County jail and he remains incarcerated to this day. Gleiss, who has returned to her American roots, still cannot forget what occurred during her 21-year infatuation with Japan. “Those root-bound days of my bonsai years, those days when I was essentially forced to be a child…have never left me and they never will.” ??? To put all that occurred into perspective she has written a book detailing her years in the culture as a wife, mother, and later interpreter. She hopes her personal account of living inside a culture that idolizes, and often overtly sexualizes, schoolgirls opens a few eyes.

“Those that love what is often termed the “cutie” culture of Japan need to understand how the popularity of such imagery can cause girls and young women to hide their own character and personal strengths” which she says often continues until a girl becomes a mother and loses her child-like appeal for good– something she experienced as her husband began to treat her more harshly in her late twenties…an age he considered “old.” Gleiss says, “For the love of Japan, girls need a real voice– their own style…not some idealized, comic-like version.”

Gleiss serves as an activist/advocate for a national organization called “Stop the Silence” which educates and encourages victims to speak publicly about their abuse. You can find Gleiss’ redemptive story “The Six-Foot Bonsai: A Soul Lost in the Land of the Rising Sun” on Amazon (LINK).

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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What does a Saudi “whore” look like? Just go to Hardee’s in Jeddah to have a look

Apparently you can get a “whore” in Jeddah from the fast food outlet Hardee’s. At least according to Saudi Sheikh Ali Al Mutairi. These women are “prostitutes” – for working and earning their living to take care of their families – because men happen to be in the same place. What an embarrassment Sheikh Ali Al Mutairi is for his country and his people. Maybe it’s time to implement ‘honor killing’ of men so Saudi Arabia can restore some honor.

Where is King Abdullah and his magic ‘people eraser’ when you need it the most?

A Twitter post ignited a battle of arguments over a post tweeted by a Saudi cleric describing the newly-introduced waitress at a fast-food restaurant in Saudi Arabia as “prostitutes”.

The debated topic sparked when Saudi Sheikh Ali Al Mutairi reacted to a number of Saudi tweets calling for the boycott of popular American fast-food restaurant, Hardee’s.

The reason?

The burger chain had recently allowed women – for the first time – to work as waitresses at their branches across the coastal city of Jeddah.

“At the beginning of her shift she’s a waitress. When her shift ends she becomes a prostitute. The more she’s around men the easier it becomes to get closer to her”, tweeted Al-Mutairi, whose twitter account (@4aalmutairi ) boasts more than 5,000 followers.

Despite this cleric’s views reflecting an existing frustration amongst some conservative segments in Saudi Arabia which oppose women’s right to work and fear that allowing females to mix with men may lead to unwanted social behaviours, Mutari’s rather controversial tweet was deemed too extreme to many Saudis on Twitter.

“Prostitution is not in working trying to survive but it is in corrupted minds that use religion to distort other’s reputation,” posted one male in response to Mutar’s tweet.

Many commented by telling Sheikh Al Mutairi that through doubting the morality of ‘chaste’ women and describing them in the way he did, the cleric would be committing a serious vice, according to well-known Islamic teachings.

Another tweep posted pictures of some Hardee’s waitresses posted over social media by saying “These women are all covered up that I wouldn’t look at them, plus if your sister goes to that restaurant would you prefer a man or a woman taking her order?”

Despite the reaction to Sheikh Al-Mutairi’s views being mostly critical, there were some supportive tweets like one which says, “We know your intention and we give you the benefit of the doubt; stay as you are, a splinter in the throats of liberals”.

As reactions mounted and a hashtag was created to discuss his tweet, Al-Mutairi replied to many of his critics saying:

“In the name of God, I have seen this hashtag and some are asking to apologise because they think I have defamed Hardee’s waitresses – the truth is I warned from the dangers of sexes mixing, at the beginning she is a waitress and in the end they will want her to become a prostitute and between are the devil’s steps”, tweeted the sheikh.

“As for hypocrites who shave their beards and moustache (a common way of describing liberals in Saudi Arabia), there is no apology for them because their zeal isn’t for God,” he added.

The Saudi Ministry of Labour has been implementing a strategy which aims at creating more job opportunities and workplaces for women. However, segregation of sexes is applied in most public venues across Saudi Arabia.

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Chinese men smoke cigarettes, have bad teeth, and a small dick; African men have pimples, diabetes, and a soft dick; but we are most civilized and have a big dick.

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This New Strain Is Specifically Catered To The Female Orgasm - And Perfect For Valentine's Day

Marijuana’s ability to act as an aphrodisiac has been well documented – but what about a strain specifically designed to bring women to orgasm?

Introducing Sexxpot, the “aphrodisiac weed” specially targeted at women – and set to make your Valentine’s Day romp that much more spectacular.

The idea for the strain came to Paradigm Medical Marijuana founder Karyn Wagner after a passionate lovemaking session enhanced by a pre-coitus joint last year. While there’s nothing new about smoking cannabis to get in the mood, this time she was taken to new heights.

Sexxpot is derived from the low-THC strain, Mr. Nice. Wagner says the lower-than-usual levels of THC (about 14 percent) are beneficial because the consumer is placed in a “sensual” headspace that doesn’t get them too high to actually get down and dirty.

Berkeley-based cannabis consultant and nurse practitioner Eloise Theisen, who routinely treats men and women looking to enhance their sex lives with cannabis, recently weighed in on the product and gave it her stamp of approval.

“And high levels of THC can promote anti-estrogen activity, though science is still very limited … My guess is that Sexxpot, with the lower THC, regulates the body’s endocannabinoid system (the group of brain receptors that are involved with processes like pain, sensation, mood, and mediating effects of cannabis) and helps bring back the balance of hormones, but without sacrificing the therapeutic properties.”

The only downside? Sexxpot isn’t known to be quite as effective for men, whom Wagner said reported less-than-stellar experiences when consuming it themselves. Good thing the aphrodisiac cannabis market is already ripe with strains designed to make lovemaking especially explosive for all parties.

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Men are our competitors. We want less of those around. Women are our prey. We want them poor and helpless.

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