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The psychology behind sexual impulses

e spectrum of sexual impulses and fantasies is vast. In a peer-reviewed paper, sex psychologists Esben Esther Pirelli Benestad, Elsa Almas, and Kaethe Weingarten advocate a new approach to understanding sexual fetishes that may be deemed unusual or uncommon. The paper, based on work by esteemed sex psychologist John Money, compares sexual turn-ons to learning a language. It argues that as you might learn a language, you can also learn a sexual turn-on or fetish. Nichi Hodgson, sex expert, former dominatrix and spokesperson for pleasure accessories brand Ooh by Je Joue, told The Independent: "Traditionally, a fetish is an object, or body part, that someone needs present in order to experience sexual arousal." "Many fetishes are routed in childhood experience. As a former dominatrix, I used to get people coming to me for spanking and caning because they'd received corporal punishment at school, often in a completely un-erotic context." "They'd ended up eroticising the experience as a means of processing the discomfort around it but also because the buttocks and anus contain hundreds of nerve endings that can create arousal in a situation that would otherwise be as divorced from sex as any other aspect of school life." "Many people can't explain their fetishes though; instead they just know they exist. Feet are a good example. There's actually a scientific theory that says there's some cross-wiring in the brain of foot fetishists - the areas of the brain that are associated with the genitalia and the brain are next to one another." Ms Hodgson explained that as long as fetishism is part of a healthy and consensual sex-life, there's nothing intrinsically wrong with exploring it. "There's nothing innately destructive about fetishism," he said. "If it predominates all sexual activity, it can become a problem as most partners have a broader repertoire than just spanking, say. But if it's incorporated into consensual and shared-idea sex, it's just another quirk of human sexuality." "The trick is to work it into the sex you already have and it will cease to matter if it's a fetish or not."

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DGP seeks report on sexual abuse of minors in Agra

Agra: Taking cognizance of reports in local newspapers about minors facing sexual abuse in Agra Range, the Uttar Pradesh director general of police (DGP) S Javeed Ahmad has sought a status report of all rape cases that have taken place in recent months in the districts that come under the range. On Wednesday, the office of the DIG Agra range began collecting data for the status report on all sexual abuse cases involving minors that took place in Agra, Mathura, Mainpuri and Firozabad districts. Public relation officer of DIG Agra range R K Mishra told TOI, "Based on the recent reports of sexual abuse involving minors, the DGP has sought the details of all recent cases from us. Hence, we are compiling all reports and will soon dispatch it to the police headquarters in Lucknow." The official took note of all the reports that TOI had published about minors being sexually abused in Agra range. TOI had on June 20 reported that Agra range had witnessed at least 15 cases of rape or attempt to rape of minors. In June alone there were four such cases. On June 19, a six-year-old girl was allegedly raped in a mango orchard by a teenager in Kasganj district. While on June 14, a 15-year-old girl was allegedly gang-raped in the same district by her neighbour's son and friend. And on June 13, an 11-year-old girl was raped by her uncle in Agra. In the most shocking case of them all, a khap panchayat in Kasganj district had offered a 13-year-old rape survivor Rs 50,000 to forgive her tormentor on June 3.

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Offenders in 99% sexual abuse cases are known to survivors

KOCHI: The latest data on Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act by National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) shows that persons booked under section 4 and 6 of the Act in Kerala are known to the survivors in 99 per cent of cases. The percentage share of known cases, 99 per cent, is higher than the national average of 94.8 per cent. As per the NCRB data, the state had recorded 102 cases registered under section 4 and 6 of POCSO Act. In 19 each cases, the offenders were employerco-worker and neighbours of the victim. While the offenders were family members in 12 cases, relatives and close family members were the perpetrators in 13 and five cases respectively . Of the total 102 cases reported in 2015, the offender was not known to the victim in only one case. In 30 cases those who abused the children were known to them but not kins or neighbours. According to State Child Rights Commission member Sandhya J, the Kerala scenario is not different from the national scenario. "It is a concern. In the case of strangers, children can be given self-defence training and the state can also take other control measures. Rehabilitation of the children also becomes a fruitless exercise as they would have to be sent back to same unsafe environments. Unfortunately, the state does not have an effective mechanism to take care of the child till he or she becomes an adult," said Sandhya. The state lacks child care homes where effective rehabilitation and counselling can be done. "Such incidents indicate erosion of values wherein people seek immediate gratification of sexual urge. The state has to put in more effort in rehabilitating victims by identifying existing children's care homes and imparting training. There are around 200 such homes in the state and some of them can be converted into specialised institutions to take care of child victims," said M P Antony, president of State Council for Social Welfare.

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