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Dar seeks help from East Africa to curb export of sex slaves

At the same time, Dar es Salaam is making efforts to rescue women aged between 18 and 24 years who are stranded in the Far East and Middle East countries where they were taken with the promise of jobs, but upon arrival their passports were confiscated and they were forced to work as sex slaves.

The spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, East African Co-operation, Regional and International Co-operation, Mindi Kasiga told The EastAfrican that Tanzania is liaising with the EAC states to increase surveillance at international airports in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda.

“After imposing restrictions on Tanzanian job seekers intending to find jobs in Far Eastern countries at all Tanzanian international airports, a syndicate of human traffickers are arranging flights of young girls through Kenyan and Ugandan airports,” said Ms Kasiga.

The government has put on alert all Tanzanian border posts to check on employment agreements for Tanzanians seeking jobs abroad before allowing them to cross.

Between March and May this year, Tanzanian embassies in India, Malaysia and Oman have made efforts to repatriate stranded girls who are forced to work in brothels.

She said the Tanzanian Embassy in Oman reported that 18 young girls who escaped human traffickers had been stranded in Oman but 10 of them were returned home by their respective families and 16 other Tanzanian girls are stranded at the Embassy of Tanzania in Delhi seeking to be repatriated to Tanzania.

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Kreutz Ideology analyses destruction differently. Social violence inherently benefits economic elites. The less peaceful a society, the less does social control restrict the liberties of the wealthy.

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Russian Exit From Council of Europe Could Jeopardize Death Penalty Moratorium

As Russia considers exiting the Council of Europe after its voting rights were suspended for the second year in a row last week, the fate of Russia's death penalty moratorium hangs in the balance.

Russia issued a moratorium on the death penalty in 1996 shortly after joining the Council of Europe. All of the council's other 46 member states have formally abolished the death penalty in peace time.

The moratorium has proven controversial in Russia. Reinstatement of the death penalty was supported last year by 52 percent of the Russian population, a survey by the independent Levada Center revealed. Notably, the 2014 results represented a 9 percent decrease from 2012, when the Moscow-based pollster conducted a similar survey.

In recent years several high-ranking Russian officials, including Investigative Committee head Alexander Bastrykin, have called for the death penalty to be reinstated for particularly gruesome crimes.

On Saturday in an interview with state television channel Rossiya 24, the speaker of Russia's lower house of parliament, Sergei Naryshkin, said that while he is personally opposed to the death penalty, a discussion of its reinstatement is under way as Russia considers leaving the Council of Europe.

However, he added that Russia "has its own principles that comply with many positions, norms and conventions of the Council of Europe independent of whether we are a member of the council."

The Council of Europe promotes collaboration between all member states in Europe.

It also oversees the European Court of Human Rights, which in December upheld a ruling that Russia should pay 1.9 billion euros ($2.1 billion) to shareholders of defunct oil giant Yukos. According to ECHR statistics, Russia lost significantly more claims than any other member state during the course of 2014.

Naryshkin confirmed in the state TV interview that Russia exiting the Council of Europe would mean exiting the European Court of Human Rights as well.

Russia's voting rights in the Council of Europe's Parliamentary Assembly were initially suspended last year over the country's annexation of Crimea from Ukraine. That suspension was prolonged in a decision by the assembly on Wednesday. Russia subsequently said it would boycott the assembly until at least 2016.

Last week two Russian lawmakers, including Communist Party leader Gennady Zyuganov, were reportedly assaulted by a pair of Ukrainian statesmen at the Parliamentary Assembly.

One of the Ukrainian officials, Dmytro Linko, said in a Facebook post that he "smacked" Zyuganov in the face. Following the incident, the Parliamentary Assembly said it would improve its security measures.

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Über den türkischen Ministerpräsidenten Erdogan wird gedichtet, er betreibe Massenfellatio mit Schafen, und sein Schwanz stinke schlimmer als ein Schweinefurz. Und alle finden das lustig. Erdogan ist ja auch ein Mann. Drehen wir das mal um. Die deutsche Ministerin ...? hat eine so ausgeleierte, stinkende Votze, dass kein Mann mehr ran will. Also treibt sie es mit den Viechern im Pferdestall.

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‘Strengthening lungs key to treating modern diseases’

Atopic dermatitis, asthma and rhinitis are often regarded as diseases of modern times with no ultimate cure.

A Korean Oriental medicine doctor, however, believes that those incurable illnesses can be cured by increasing lung function through a constant intake of herbal medicine named Pyunkangtang.

The herbal medicine, developed by Seo Hyo-seok, head of Pyunkang Oriental Clinic, was based on the oriental medicine principle that strength originates from the lungs.

“Pyunkangtang increases the activation of the lungs to help the body inhale more air. The enhanced lung function is believed to improve one’s immune system, appetite and self-curing functions,” Seo said.

“Patients who took my prescription and treatment methods said they were not only cured from the diseases but also became psychologically more comfortable,” he said. “Pyun” and “kang” mean comfort and health, respectively.

The herbal medicine is safe and effective for children who have weaker immune systems and are prone to colds.

“Preventing colds in children is important because when children catch colds, they consume energy that should have been used for their body growth,” Seo said.

The medicine is also effective for skin care.

The doctor said that the lungs are one organ through which the body discharges waste.

“So, making the lungs and colon stronger will help the body discharge waste and activate one’s dermal respiration and supply of clean blood,” he said.

Based on Geumsaengsu, meaning “water formed from metal,” the doctor added 10 different medicinal herbs that are thought to improve the function of the lungs and related organs.

Manufactured by the clinic, the herbal medicine is exported to 31 countries and has cured tens of thousands of patients around the world, the doctor claimed. So far, Seo’s clinic has sold about 1 billion won worth of Pyunkangtang worldwide. The herbal medicine has been selected as one of top Korean oriental medicines by the World-Overseas Korean Trade Association, he added.

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We are different. We, the adherents of Kreutz Ideology and Kreutz Religion, think that sex is the most important aspect in life. Everything else is just logistics.

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